Lisa Bradley - Re/Max Vision



Posted by Lisa Bradley on 1/7/2020

Image by Gerd Altmann from Pixabay

When you're considering buying real estate as an investment, it's a good idea to weigh the pros and cons. That's especially important with "subject-to" real estate, because there can be risks and rewards with this type of property that are different from traditional purchases. Here's what you should be considering, before you decide on this investment strategy.

The Pros of "Subject-To" Real Estate  

On the "pro" side of buying "subject-to" real estate is the way you can acquire multiple properties for your portfolio. Additional benefits include:

  • There's no need to get a mortgage in your name, so you won't be overextending your credit or finances.
  • You avoid a lot of the transaction fees that come with getting a mortgage and buying a property.
  • You can close on the property quickly, and you'll pay fewer title company fees in the process.
  • You can buy as many properties as you want, as fast as you want, and all you have to do is make the mortgage payments.
  • You'll be helping sellers who are facing foreclosure or otherwise need to get out from under their house payments.
  • The Cons of "Subject-To" Real Estate  

    With any real estate transaction or investment of any kind, there are cons that come along with the pros. When you weigh them carefully, here's what you should be thinking about:

  • If the seller files bankruptcy, the original lender could foreclose on the property and you may lose your investment.
  • The lender could exercise their "due on sale clause," and require that the current mortgage balance be paid in full.
  • The deed could be tainted in some way, and without title insurance in your name you might not be protected.
  • You may end up spending money on an attorney if something goes wrong during the process.
  • Technically, the bank still owns the home because there's a mortgage on it.
  • Why Choose This Type of Real Estate Investment?

    If you don't have the money or credit to buy investment properties, buying "subject-to" can be a good choice if you understand and mitigate the risks. You may also want to choose this option if you're trying to acquire a lot of properties quickly, and you want to save money over traditional purchasing options. For people who buy "subject-to", there can be big opportunities to buy quality properties they might not be able to afford under typical circumstances.

    But it's very important that you're aware of the risks and legalities. Getting an attorney to help you with the first few properties, and to collect and make the mortgage payments on all the properties you buy, can be one of the ways you can make this type of transaction safer and better for you and the seller.




    Tags: Mortgage   Investment   home loan  
    Categories: Uncategorized  


    Posted by Lisa Bradley on 11/26/2019

    Photo by Charles Thompson via Pixabay

    A vast majority of homebuying  transactions rely on the buyer qualifying for a mortgage through a bank. After all, most people don't have enough cash lying around to buy a home outright. Nowadays, you have more options with different types of lenders and alternative financing companies where you can seek pre-approval online. But sometimes even these options don't work out, as pre-approval doesn't mean you're actually going to get the underwriter at the lender to approve you.

    This could make you consider other alternative options like seller-financed mortgages.

    What is a Seller-Financed Mortgage and How Does It Work?

    As the name implies, you are financing your purchase with the person or company selling the home instead of taking out a mortgage with a lender. It's a private transaction where you, the buyer, make an arrangement with the seller to buy the property.

    The seller draws up a promissory note that details the terms of the mortgage: interest rate, payment schedule, and the consequences if you default on the mortgage. In most cases, the seller then finances the sale for a short term, usually five years, with a balloon payment at the end of the period. However, the promissory note can be sold at any time to another financing company: sellers don't necessarily need to wait for the buyer to refinance with a more traditional lender.

    Why Would I Consider a Seller-Financed Mortgage?

    There are situations that make it difficult to work with a traditional lender, such as:

    • Self-employment / entrepreneurship
    • Foreign employment
    • Frequent job changes, or you haven't held the same job long enough
    • Poor or no credit
    • Tax-related issues
    • Debt-income ratio is too high

    Sometimes, these situations can be incredibly frustrating when you know you'd be able to afford the mortgage payment or it's even far less than market rent where you want to buy! Alternative lenders may have options but sometimes even they don't want to lend to the self-employed or borrowers with high student loan or credit card debt.

    This makes seller financing a more viable option when you can demonstrate your ability to make payments but are having trouble with the traditional channels.

    What are the Key Pros and Cons of Seller-Financed Mortgages?

    The down payment, interest rate, and other terms are more flexible although they may not necessarily be better than what you would get with a bank. There are also no points, PMI, or origination fees which can save money upfront and over the life of the loan.

    Closing is also much faster, easier, and cheaper because there's no loan officer or underwriter involved. 

    However, the seller may not always confirm they're able to finance the sale. If the seller has a mortgage, most of them have a due on sale clause that forbids them from selling the home without paying off their mortgage balance first. If the seller still does this without paying off the mortgage first, your new home could get foreclosed on.

    The homebuying process can be a difficult undertaking, but we're here to help you find the best options so you can buy your dream home as quickly as possible. Reach out today to learn more!





    Posted by Lisa Bradley on 6/18/2019

    A common problem among homeowners is the reality that life is unpredictable. There are so many things and so many issues that may come along the way. Owning a house can be both an asset and a liability if it does not get done right. 

    Can I Sell My Property Even If It Is On Mortgage? 

    Yes, you may sell your property even if it is on the mortgage. 

    You may opt to sell it because you got your best luck and you are moving before the end of the original mortgage contract.

    You may also decide to sell if you own a property, but you are going through some financial difficulty, you may either refinance your home and make use of the equity or sell your house and downgrade to a smaller one or lease an apartment. We have all been there, and the truth of the matter is that every person who has come face to face with financial difficulty should have a guide on how they can go about selling the property. 

    How To Sell Your Property On Mortgage

    The following are the steps to take:

    1. Meet with a professional real estate listing agent. Tell them your situation and they will help you find out your current mortgage payoff. Once this information is available, you will figure out the following items:

    - Your current borrowing situation;

    - How much your asking price needs to be for you to be able to pay off the remaining loan balance; and...

    - The probability of making some money out of the sale.

    2. Once you have all the information, the real estate agent can go ahead and make a sale. Afterward, you get to discuss how you are going to get some value off the purchase.

    What If The Property Value Is Less Than What I Owe? 

    If you owe more than what you are going to make from the sale, you can talk to a bank to make a short sale. You can read more about that in this article.

    Final Word

    You can follow the above steps and sell your property even if it is on the mortgage. It will take maturity to handle a financial difficulty that forces your hand to sell your house, even if it is not yours yet. It also takes a lot of luck to be able to move to a more prominent place long before you paid off your last mortgage. What matters at this point is to contact a real estate agent and help you get through with the sale without any glitches.




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    Posted by Lisa Bradley on 6/4/2019

    Most people that obtain a mortgage loan against another property usually plan to buy a second house. This means that they are not ready to sell or move out of their existing place of residence, but they wish to have a second house that they can occupy later, use as a vacation retreat or as an income property. A mortgage loan secured against another property is known as a second mortgage. 

    A second mortgage on another property is also a long-term loan in your name against the home you intend to buy. It is worth noting, however, that this mortgage differs from a secured charge mortgage or remortgage.

    Benefits of securing a mortgage loan against another property 

    - The advantages of going for a second mortgage is that it is separate from your current mortgage. Therefore, your existing property is not at direct risk.

    - A second mortgage could be a cheaper loan when compared with second charge mortgage or secure loan 

    Drawbacks of securing a mortgage loan against another property

    - One of the disadvantages of acquiring a second mortgage is that it requires a second deposit.

    - Paying for two mortgages at a time can be quite expensive.

    - Affordability checks of the second mortgage are stringent.

    - Going for a second mortgage may put your current apartment at an indirect risk. Meaning that you might have to sell your existing home to cover the repayment of the second mortgage. 

    How to secure a mortgage loan against another property 

    You must be aware of the fact that you will be subjected to stricter affordability checks when applying for a second mortgage. A second mortgage is much harder to approve because of these measures. You have to get all your documents ready, especially those that will prove that your income can cover the cost of two mortgages.

    Apart from getting your documents ready, try to minimize spending well before tendering your application for a better chance. Also, it is essential that you make a comparison across the market to know the right deal for you. Another trick to improve your chances of getting your second mortgage approved is by repaying the first mortgage as quickly as possible. Decide on what you want to do with your second home as this will affect your mortgage.

    Are you planning to secure a mortgage loan against another property? Check out the tips given above. They will help you get your application approved whenever you decide to go for a second mortgage. Your real estate agent may have special relationships with mortgage brokers or lenders in your area, talk to them for additional advice.




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    Posted by Lisa Bradley on 9/11/2018

    Once you have gone through the pre-approval process and have narrowed down your home search, thereís a good chance youíll soon find a place that you want to make an offer on. This can seem like a huge step for any first time homebuyer. Even seasoned home buyers feel butterflies when the time comes to make an offer on a home they love. Before you even start your home search, you should become educated on how to make a good offer in order to land the property that you really want. Thereís so many factors that effect your offer including the surrounding properties and the current state of the market. Here are a few very important pieces of advice that you should heed in order to have a successful time securing a home and closing the deal. 

    Craft A Persuasive Offer

    In many areas thereís a low inventory of homes and a high number of those seeking to buy. This means that youíre not guaranteed to get a property that you have made an offer on. Lowball offers might not be at all competitive and even insulting to sellers in certain markets. Often, you may need to make an offer of more than the asking price if youíre in love with a home. By working with your real estate agent and doing the right research, you can craft an offer on a home that will be compelling for sellers.    

    Decide On Your Contingencies 

    Once an offer has been accepted, itís time to get to work on those contingencies. Be especially mindful of financing contingencies. If something falls through in the process, youíll want to be sure you can get the deposit you made back. Also keep in mind that sellers love reliable buyers who have already been preapproved.  

    Home inspection contingencies are another area of importance. After you sign the purchase agreement and the inspection is complete, youíre allowed to ask the seller to make repairs or provide you with a counter offer. While this can be one of the more nerve-wracking aspects of home buying, it has many positives. Home inspections protect buyers from purchasing a home that they canít live with in cases of extreme mold, termites and other environmental and structural issues. 

    The appraisal contingency is also important. In order for you to qualify for a loan, the property must be appraised. The property must be valued at or above the purchase price. A loan will only be approved by a lender up to the appraised value. If your home loan is $400,000 but your home of choice is appraised at $390,000, youíll have a problem.       

    Your Finances Matter Until You Get To The Closing Table

    Donít go crazy with all kinds of purchases before you reach the closing table. Opening a new credit account at your favorite furniture store, for example, could lead to a disastrous surprise on closing day. Hold off on big purchases until after you secure your home. Also avoid making large transfers or deposits from your bank account. donít do anything to negatively affect your credit score

      

    Know What To Bring To The Closing

    Donít show up to the closing for your home purchase unprepared. Youíll need to have the following items: 


    • Photo ID
    • Checkbook
    • Cosigners 



    Think Ahead


    Be sure that you think of the future when youíre purchasing your home. Youíll need to have enough cash flow to pay for things like property taxes, home insurance, utility bills and even new furniture for your home. Plan your future mortgage payments accordingly. Some companies have payments that are monthly or bimonthly. 


    While buying a home is a huge undertaking, with the right plans in place, the process will be as seamless as possible. With the right plans, the moving truck will be pulling into the driveway before you know it.      




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